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Julia Condon

Julia Condon is half Austrian and half English, was born in Pakistan and lived in India before moving to London at the age of five. She received her BA in Fine Arts at Central School of Art and Design in 1979 and had her first solo exhibition in 1986 in London. Seeking the challenge of new ideas, she moved shortly thereafter to New York, where she lived and exhibited her work until she moved back to Europe in 2000.

Over time her work expanded from large oil paintings of portraits and figures to much smaller works on wooden panels. These became a series of still lives, mostly taken from the natural world; feathers, shells, crystals. Such was her delight in painting these objects, that she still continues to paint them today. These small paintings have a jewel like quality, their backgrounds composed of a rich and mysterious black that connects them into a series but allows them to equally stand alone in their beauty and isolation. The content and format of these paintings have an ageless quality, yet a modern simplicity as the background wraps around the edges of the panels to bring an almost sculptural feeling to the whole piece.

By 1995 her intense interest and study of metaphysics unexpectedly expanded her paintings into a more abstract but no less intensely felt format. Using subtle layers of colour and form, she started a series of mandala paintings, a manifestation of her exploration and work with energy and light.

The structure of my painted Mandalas begins with a square, the four sides of which represent the four elements. From there I allow myself to be guided by the Mandala, starting at the central point. I don’t think through the paint or colours, but simply focus on the intention of the work. The colours associated with the vibrations of each chakra often appear in these Mandalas.

The process Julia Condon uses for both her Mandalas and still lives is painstaking, using glazing techniques taken from Renaissance paintings there can be as many eighty layers on a single painting, each needing a day or two to dry. It is because of this skill however that her paintings have so much depth and vibrancy.

Julia Condon lives and works in her studio on Bodmin Moor in Cornwall.

 
 

For further information or to make an appointment to discuss a particular project, please contact Fleur Rossdale on 07887 681 311.